Artists | Senzeni Marasela

2018
Neo Image Matloga
Sinethemba Twalo
Abdulrazaq Awofeso
Jabu Arnell and Sinethemba Twalo
Option Dzikamai Nyahunzvi
Terrence Musekiwa

2016
Tiisetso Molobi
Lazi Mathebula
Pamela Clarkson
Atta Kwami
Mongezi Ncaphayi
Em'kal Eyongakpa

2015
Atef Berredjem
Rehema Chachage
Mohamed Ahmed Abdel Rasoul

2014
Moshekwa Langa
Bernard Akoi-Jackson
Helen Zeru Araya
Admire Kamudzengerere

2013
Ashraf Moneim
Awaad Issa
Lara Bourdin
Zanele Muholi
Louis Boshoff
Ruan Hoffmann
Krishna Luchoomun
Sultana Haukim
Adriaan de Villiers

2012
Koyo Kouoh
Michele Tabor
Viktor Ekpuk
Santu Mofokeng
Mihret Kebede

2011
Hasan and Husain Essop
Nisren Abasher Ahmed
Leo Lefort

2010
Akintunde Akinleye
Akirash
Ndikhumbule Ngqinambi
Ruan Hoffmann
Michael Tsegaye

2009
Adriaan de Villiers
Hadia Gana
Zanele Muholi

2007
Victor Ekpuk
Doreen Southwood
Clifford Charles
Assefa Gebrekidan

2006
Guy Wouete
Thulani Shongwe
Nicholas Hlobo
Doreen Southwood
Odili Donald Odita

2005
Rehab El Sadek

2003
Papisto Boy
John Murray
Isaac Carlos
Rose Kirumira
Dominique Zinkpé

2002
Senzeni Marasela
Tarek Zaki
Kheto Lualuali
Meshac Gaba
Darryl Accone
Nawaal Deane
Henk Rossouw
Rafs Mayet
Louis Mhlanga

2001
Krishna Luchoomun

2000
Moss Mogale
Samson Kambalu
Abrie Fourie
Dominique Fontaine
Ilse Pahl

1999
Saliou Traore
Alassane Drabo
Harry Mutasa
Moshekwa Langa
Jeremy Wafer

1998
Mustafa Maluka

1997
Shepard Mtyshelwa
Liza du Plessis
Allina Ndebele
Greg Streak
Dominic Tshabangu

1996
Stephen Maqashela

1995
Ina van zyl
Progress Matubako

1993
Tito Zungu
Noria Mbabasa
Helen Sebidi
Sue Williamson
David Koloane
Andries Botha
Pat Mautloa

1992
Sandra Kriel
Clifford Charles
Dianse Paulse
Sarah Tabane

South Africa
Senzeni Marasela
Senzeni Marasela

Senzeni Marasela ‘Artists have an important role to play in telling stories about our turbulent history, especially when so many of the sincere gestures which make up this history have been cut down and mutilated.’

A central theme in Marasela’s (1977) work is dealing with memories from the past. Her alliance with black South Africans has led her to delve into the South African heritage like an archivist. But she also gives her own personal view of history, therefore ushering both her own story and that of others into the historical framework.
Marasela uses photography, photocopy transfers, silkscreening and handicraft to explore collective and personal memory. Her choice of 'raw' (unprocessed) fabrics like calico, set against the highly worked quality of lace have, for her, strong ties to colonialism. The labour-intensive process of handstitching is her way of inscribing herself into this past she wishes to explore, as well as attempting to elevate her chosen imagery into a realm of the cherished and respected.
During her stay as an artist-in-residence with her three-year-old son in the Autumn of 2002, Senzeni Marasela participated in ‘Upstream’, an exhibition organized to commemorate the founding of the Dutch East India Company 400 years ago. Marasela released three hundred bottles stuffed with handkerchiefs into the pond of the Hortus Botanicus. The handkerchiefs were embroiderd with personal messages and statements from the South African Truth and Reconciliation Committee.

Senzeni Marasela links

Art-bio
Woven Maze
Auckland Gallery
www.thefword.org.uk/features/2010/03/claudia_zeiske

Thami Mnyele Foundation promotes the exchange of art and culture between Africa and the Netherlands.